Submission to the AER’s Network and Retail Exemption Guidelines Review

Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on facebook
Facebook

Compliance Quater has lodged a submission with the AER addressing the questions raised by the AER but also drawing the AER’s attention to a range of issues that we have identified within the guidelines.

We’ve submitted that the AER should consider implementing a ‘fast track approval’ process for the approval of proposed retrofit conversions of sites where the resulting embedded network would clearly bring consumers better pricing and where the configuration of the network infrastructure facilitates consumers who wish to ‘opt-out.’

As energy sellers know, the regulatory framework is partly designed to set the minimum standards of conduct expected and to punish those that are non-compliant. We believe that it is time that incentives were built into the regulatory framework. Where energy sellers develop products or services that have a clear consumer benefit, they should be rewarded by, for example, faster approvals. Faster approvals result in better commercial outcomes for energy sellers and those should be tied to consumer benefits.

Compliance Quarter supports energy sellers by helping them establish effective compliance programs. For exempt sellers, we provide guidelines, checklists, and training.

If you would like assistance with your compliance program, email info@compliancequarter.com.au

More to explorer

Technicians installing photovoltaic solar panels on roof of house.

Compliance Quarter’s Submission to the AER’s Review of the Compliance Procedures and Guidelines

On 11 April 2024, Compliance Quarter put forward its submission on proposed changes to the AER Compliance Procedures and Guidelines. The AER is reviewing its Compliance procedures and guidelines, which set out the manner and form in which energy businesses in jurisdictions that have adopted the National Energy Retail Law must submit compliance information and data to the AER. We argue that there should be consideration of measures to incentivise early reporting of potential breaches. These may, for example, take the

person wearing foo dog costume

Obligations of Energy Retailers Regarding Best Offer Information

Energy retailers in Victoria have specific obligations under the Energy Retail Code of Practice to provide clear information to customers about their ‘best offer’ – that is, the plan that would minimize the customer‘s energy costs based on their usage history. The objective is to ensure small customers can easily understand whether they are on the retailer‘s best plan for them and how to access the retailer‘s best offer if not. One of the significant challenges in the energy sector (as in banking and elsewhere) is that customers

low angle photo of sydney opera house australia

Guide to the National Energy Retail Rules

The National Energy Retail Rules (NERR) are a set of rules that govern the sale and supply of electricity and gas by retailers to consumers in Australia, alongside the related National Energy Retail Law (NERL). The NERR came into effect on 1 July 2012 in Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory, and the Commonwealth. South Australia followed on 1 February 2013, New South Wales on 1 July 2013, and Queensland on 1 July 2015. The NERR do not yet apply in

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *